Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Internet Technology

Beware of your children of using internet make them forget everything. The Internet right now more visible to us, to children and to everybody and a whole lot of it is junk, spam or inane status updates. How do you begin to navigate through the zillions of news articles, Web sites, tweets and other stuff online to find content that matters to you?

These are the online equivalents of the extremely savvy, clued-in friends you always turn to for new new music, and who always get an invite to your cocktail party because you know they’ve got something interesting to talk about or show off.

You may have known about the digital Curator, or even have use. On the Web, digital curators help to organize and manage the data deluge. Content may be still be king, but curated content, filtered through a sieve to help put it into context, may soon begin to reign supreme.

Like their museum counterparts, digital curators either individuals, communities or Web services are adept at unearthing gems and obscure artifacts from the Web that might be of interest to a larger audience.

Let’s say you find the glut of videos on YouTube overwhelming. Rather than aimlessly skipping between the latest Rihanna music video and grainy shorts of narcoleptic puppies to entertain yourself during your lunch hour, head to a site that sifts through heaps of online videos to produce a handcrafted playlist of content.

For example, there’s Nizmlab, where editors comb through YouTube and Vimeo to offer a current snapshot of viral videos and popular shorts bubbling up on the Web. Recently featured videos ranged from a 3-D short about an aircraft carrier to a commercial stunt involving crowds singing in Trafalgar Square.

You can find a more eclectic sampling of online video at Chunnel.tv, a repository for bizarre, artsy clips that includes shorts by the Czech surrealist Jan Svankmajer, stop-motion paper craft and propaganda videos from the 1976 swine flu outbreak.
Those are some of my favorite video curators, but you may have others share them in the comments below.

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